Session/Drill RPE and REST-Q Recovery Stress Questionnaire Plan

IDEA: In today’s high-performance athletic model, more and more is being expected of the athletes, coaches, and support staff. The athletes however, are the only ones forced to rise to the occasion in terms of meeting demands placed upon them. As coaches, we sometimes forget or neglect the true “value” of what we are asking … Continue reading Session/Drill RPE and REST-Q Recovery Stress Questionnaire Plan

Most Recent Speaking Engagement: Athletic Lab – Cary, NC. Simple/Practical Training for Collegiate Olympic Sports

https://youtu.be/NUaCAOPiMiM   Here is a very "iffy" video of my presentation at Athletic Lab's "High Performance Athletic Development Clinic" in Cary, NC - May 28th-29th 2016. A lot of amazing speakers and a phenomenal weekend of learning. Below is a download link for the powerpoint I used. HIGHPERFORMANCEPRESENTATION

Keep it Simple Part 4: Simplifying cues for agility and knee kinematics, what do you look for?

  Continuing with a theme from the previous article where I talked about movement and tissue quality, I wanted to hit on another topic that follows in the same vein. Cleaning up all types of movement is something that should come first and foremost on our list of priorities as strength & conditioning coaches. Of course, … Continue reading Keep it Simple Part 4: Simplifying cues for agility and knee kinematics, what do you look for?

Keep it simple Part 3: What are you doing about mobility?

For those of us in the collegiate strength & conditioning setting, it's not always easy to address each piece of the physical preparation puzzle in the time we're given. More specifically, the challenge lies within giving as much attention as we'd like to each piece. What are those different pieces? Gray Cook wraps it up … Continue reading Keep it simple Part 3: What are you doing about mobility?

Keep it simple, an approach to training Olympic and field sports Part 2: It all starts with strength (A Case Study)

Continuing from my previous article (Part 1) I've decided to take my own advice and keep it simple here in part 2. I want to talk about a few of the metrics I'm using to track player progress as well as how I'm attacking some unique parts of our situation. Firstly, this has been a … Continue reading Keep it simple, an approach to training Olympic and field sports Part 2: It all starts with strength (A Case Study)

Keep it simple, an approach to training Olympic and field sports: Part 1 – Understanding the nuances of Olympic and field sports.

Part 1 of a series specifically concerning the training of college Olympic and field sports.  This article may annoy some people (if anyone actually reads it,) but my purpose is not to stir the pot. Rather my objective is to give points of consideration in developing training programs for young (college-bound and college) athletes. Particularly contesting the … Continue reading Keep it simple, an approach to training Olympic and field sports: Part 1 – Understanding the nuances of Olympic and field sports.

Intra-Abdominal Pressure and Trunk Rigidity

On several occasions, while trying to cultivate answers in terms of what constitute valuable lessons for our interns, I've gotten (among others) one common response. This is the importance of how to breathe in order to stabilize the trunk/torso while lifting heavy. If we are not actively teaching our athletes how to utilize intra-abdominal pressure and … Continue reading Intra-Abdominal Pressure and Trunk Rigidity

Lower Crossed Syndrome and Antagonistically Facilitated Movemement Training

I've often dealt with an uncomfortable feeling that some of the things we do as strength & conditioning coaches don't necessarily have the "transfer" we believe it should when it comes to improving athletic movement. I have a strong faith however, that a fundamental quality like strength gained in the weight room is something that can … Continue reading Lower Crossed Syndrome and Antagonistically Facilitated Movemement Training

Power Output as an Objective Measurable in Collegiate Strength & Conditioning

In college strength & conditioning, it can be challenging at times to come up with objective measurables that we can use to track the progress of our student-athletes over the course of a semester or season. I have seen and spoke with other coaches about using movement screens, rep max calculators, calisthenic rep-efforts, conditioning tests, … Continue reading Power Output as an Objective Measurable in Collegiate Strength & Conditioning